Larsblog

ISO meeting in Atlanta, day 2

Day 2 started with a presentation by Naito-san about a proposal from him and Komachi-san about a standard format for publishing PSIs. They suggest using Dublin Core to describe the PSIs. They also suggest creating topic maps to describe the PSIs. Finally, they brought up the question of which standards body should do the work (OASIS or ISO). Again, I'll link to the slides once I have them. ...

Read | 2005-11-14 00:35 | 0 comment(s)

ISO meeting in Atlanta, day 1

This is an unofficial report from the winter meeting of ISO JTC1 SC34. This is the committee responsible for SGML, DSDL (XML schema language framework), and Topic Maps, which usually has a meeting late in the year in conjunction with the XML USA conference. This year it's in Atlanta. The report is mostly about what Working Group 3 is doing, since this is the Working Group focusing on Topic Maps. ...

Read | 2005-11-12 19:30 | 3 comment(s)

SKOS in Topic Maps

I've argued for a long time that the RTM vocabulary for mapping RDF to Topic Maps makes it possible to use RDF vocabularies in Topic Maps. Nobody has really picked this up yet, probably because the presentation in the original paper makes it something of a challenge to see exactly how to do that. ...

Read | 2005-10-24 21:57 | 1 comment(s)

TMRA'05 — second day

(Second day of semi-live coverage from the TMRA'05 Topic Maps research workshop.) ...

Read | 2005-10-07 13:33 | 0 comment(s)

TMRA'05 — first day

This is a semi-live report from the first Topic Maps conference: TMRA'05 in Leipzig. ...

Read | 2005-10-06 16:33 | 4 comment(s)

XTM is not Topic Maps

For some reason a large number of people continue to believe that XTM is Topic Maps, which just isn't the case. This happens over and over again, and has all kinds of consequences. Sometimes it's no worse than people calling the technology "XML Topic Maps", other times people will make mathematical models of XTM or really implement the syntax as their model, which can be bad enough to render their work irrelevant. Which is of course a shame. ...

Read | 2005-10-02 23:24 | 4 comment(s)

"Oh, just about every kind, sir"

One thing I've always found shocking as a beer drinker is the level of knowledge about, and, even worse, interest in, beer among the people who make a living serving it. That is, waiters and bartenders. A general rule is that only in (let's say) 1 out of 10 cases will you actually get the full list if you ask what beers are available, and very often the menu won't have the full list, either, if they even bother to list beers on the menu. In most cases some persistence is required in order to actually find out what's on offer, and in some cases a lot. ...

Read | 2005-10-02 21:10 | 13 comment(s)

A visit to Nürnberg

Our recent beer holiday started in Nürnberg, a city of roughly 500,000 people in Upper Franconia. (Nürnberg is usually spelled "Nuremberg" in English, but I can't quite bring myself to do it, hence the spelling in the title.) As a tourist destination, Nürnberg has some attractions to recommend it, primarily the Altstadt (old town) with its town wall, and the Kaiserburg (imperial castle). For beer hunters it's an OK place to visit, but not really outstanding. ...

Read | 2005-09-25 19:52 | 2 comment(s)

The purity law

One thing I found very interesting in Germany was the attitude to the famous German purity law for beer (or Reinheitsgebot in German). German beer is famous world-wide for quality, and for being made without additives, and a lot of this stems from the purity law. Germans take great pride in this law, but their relationship to it can be a little puzzling at times, and the law is not only positive. ...

Read | 2005-09-17 16:55 | 13 comment(s)

Franconian beer

Beer in Franconia is something of a paradox: on the one hand there is a great profusion of breweries and beer styles, but on the other hand modern beer interest as found in other countries seems completely absent. This makes tasting beer in Franconia more of a challenge than in many other places, but also more rewarding. ...

Read | 2005-09-15 23:40 | 0 comment(s)

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