Larsblog

Polarization filter

After buying my DSLR camera I've developed symptoms of beginning camera-geekiness, and have on and off looked at all kinds of camera-related equipment, without actually buying anything. I was, however, given a polarization filter as a get well present by colleagues at work, and in return promised to write a blog entry about it. I actually find this an interesting subject to write about, and as I've now spent a few months playing with it, here we are. ...

Read | 2008-07-27 11:05 | 2 comment(s)

Burnt out

I never thought it would happen to me, but I guess they all say that. I knew I was pushing my luck, but I thought I always stayed on the right side of the line and that I'd be able to stop in time. What I didn't realize is that long-term stress wears you down gradually, and that if the effects don't get you while you're going at full speed they'll strike when you slow down. ...

Read | 2008-07-19 21:10 | 13 comment(s)

Finally solving the performance problem

I wrote about the performance problems the tmphoto application had suffered from, and my failed attempts to fix them. I decided that the problem was that I'd set out to solve the problems without really knowing what the cause was, since reducing traffic by 55% obviously wasn't going to rescue the site. So the solution must be to do some proper research first, and then try to solve it. ...

Read | 2008-07-06 14:49 | 1 comment(s)

A beer heater

I've written before about the importance of beer temperature, and creative ways of getting it right, such as using my laptop or a digital thermometer. I've been frustrated with the temperature at which beer is served in many places, and so dreamed of some kind of micro-wave based heater that would solve the problem for me. ...

Read | 2008-07-02 20:56 | 3 comment(s)

2K: The worst beers

Now that I've passed 2000 beers I figured it would be interesting to go back and look at which of these beers were the absolute worst beers. Many craft beer lovers think the worst possible beers are the mass market brands like Budweiser or the local national giant, and pour scorn on any industrial beer that is low on taste. I'm no fan of these beers myself, but there are things that are worse than having no taste, or some hints of off-tastes. ...

Read | 2008-07-01 18:41 | 8 comment(s)

On robots, URL design, and bad optimization

Over the last few weeks my photo collection application has been struggling seriously with its performance. The Tomcat server would sometimes crash, which isn't so serious, as my monitoring script would restart it at most 30 minutes later. What's worse is that often it would get stuck and also make Apache freeze, and this would kill the entire site (including this blog), and the monitor script doesn't detect that. Or, load on the server would soar into the double digits, and just stay there, basically making the server unusable until I did a manual restart. ...

Read | 2008-06-25 15:14 | 16 comment(s)

2000 beers!

On Saturday I finally passed a milestone I've been looking forward to for a while: beer rating number 2000. That's right. I've now tasted 2000 different beers. Or, to be more precise, I've written ratings of 2000 different beers on RateBeer, which is how I can be sure of the exact number. I tasted lots of beers before I started rating which I've never seen again since, so these are not counted. ...

Read | 2008-06-04 23:17 | 0 comment(s)

Goslar

When I discovered that besides being the birthplace of the beer style Gose Goslar was also a medieval town so well-preserved it's been UNESCO-listed it was clear that our German Interrail holiday would have to include a stop there. In retrospect I can say that this was definitely one of the high points of the holiday. ...

Read | 2008-06-03 16:25 | 3 comment(s)

The Kiso valley

In Tokugawa-era Japan (1600-1868) travellers had two main roads to choose between when travelling between the official imperial capital of Kyoto and the seat of power, which was Tokyo (then called Edo). One was the Tokaido, which followed the coast and required the fording of several large rivers. Another was the Nakasendo, which crossed the mountains of central Japan without crossing any major rivers. These roads were much travelled by, as the Tokugawa shogunate required all daimyos (feudal lords) to reside alternate years in Tokyo (so it could keep an eye on them), and both became very important parts of Japanese national culture. ...

Read | 2008-05-24 12:52 | 1 comment(s)

The cxtm-tests project

The cxtm-tests project has just released the first-ever release of a conformance test suite for Topic Maps implementations. The first release consists of 293 separate conformance tests using four different Topic Maps syntaxes, and more tests are being added all the time. It can be used by developers to check their implementations, and also by customers who want to verify that products which claim to conform to the standard actually do so. ...

Read | 2008-05-23 18:21 | 1 comment(s)

<< Previous Next >>

> Home
> Technology
> Beer
> Personal

> The author
> On Twitter

RSS

follow us in feedly

Subscribe by email:

My new book


Gårdsøl
det norske ølet

My other book

Guidebook to Lithuanian beer
Rough guide to
Lithuanian beer

Archive

2016-12 - 2016-06
2016-06 - 2015-10
2015-09 - 2015-04
2015-04 - 2015-01
2015-01 - 2014-10
2014-10 - 2014-07
2014-07 - 2014-05
2014-05 - 2014-02
2014-02 - 2013-10
2013-10 - 2013-09
2013-08 - 2013-02
2013-01 - 2012-09
2012-09 - 2011-04
2011-02 - 2009-10
2009-09 - 2009-02
2009-01 - 2008-10
2008-10 - 2008-07
2008-07 - 2008-05
2008-05 - 2008-01
2008-01 - 2007-11
2007-11 - 2007-09
2007-09 - 2007-07
2007-07 - 2007-04
2007-03 - 2007-01
2007-01 - 2006-11
2006-11 - 2006-10
2006-09 - 2006-08
2006-08 - 2006-07
2006-07 - 2006-05
2006-05 - 2006-03
2006-03 - 2005-12
2005-12 - 2005-10
2005-10 - 2005-09

Various blogs

Paul Krugman
James Fallows
The Loom
Digital Photography School
RealClimate
Freakonomics
Democracy in America

Beer blogs

Knut Albert
Shut up about Barclay Perkins
Det står en-og-førti øl...
The Beer Trotter
Pete Brown
Zythophile
The Beer Nut
Boak and Bailey
Beers I've known
Daft Eejit Brewing
Ancient Malt and Ale
Brewing Nordic
Timely Tipple

Technology blogs

Robert Barta
TopicObserver.Com
Sveins blogg
Stephen Fry
ongoing
Messages in a bottle
Alex Brown
Planet Topic Maps

Last comments
RSS

Courtlyn. on A maltster on Gotland

Lars Marius Garshol on A maltster on Gotland

Courtlyn on A maltster on Gotland

Stan on Herbs in Norwegian f...

Lars Marius Garshol on Herbs in Norwegian f...

Hans Mikkel Melhus on Herbs in Norwegian f...

merryn dineley on Svein, maltster and ...

Lars Marius Garshol on My book on Norwegian...

Dan on My book on Norwegian...

Lars Marius Garshol on Brewing raw ale in H...